All posts by Bishop & Sewell

Squatters Target Commercial Buildings

Squatters Target Commercial Buildings

Squatters are now targeting commercial buildings following the recent legislative changes that have criminalised the squatting of residential property. Our property litigation team were recently asked for comment by the Financial Times.

Please contact partner Shams Rahman for more information.

Mindfulness At Work Workshops

Mindfulness At Work Workshops

Bishop & Sewell LLP are proud to host the Mindfulness at Work training programme which is an innovative and effective 4 week training programme helping employees to achieve their potential. The program runs for 4 weeks starting on Thursdays from 15th November, 5pm for a 5:30pm start.

Click here, for more details.

If you are interested in attending the programme please contact Emma Cunnington on 020 7079 4191.

ALEP Autumn Conference

ALEP Autumn Conference

Mark Chick recently spoke at ALEP Autumn conference (2nd October) at the IET, Savoy Place, London, to over 200 professional delegates on the ‘future of leasehold reform’ in a joint presentation with Evelyn Levisohn of valuers Myleasehold. The conference was attended by (among others) Sir Peter Bottomley and Lucian Cook of Savills and Elodie Gibbons of Tanfield Chambers were guest speakers.

Wills & Probate News

Wills & Probate News

The autumn edition of Private Life magazine published by Arbuthnot Latham Private Bankers includes an article written by Gina Fairfax discussing the pitfalls and process needed to pass a Will successfully through probate.

Click here, for more details.

In the event that you require any further information on any of the topics raised in this article, please do not hesitate to contact Gina Fairfax on 0207 631 4141.

Further reading: Making a Will

Basements: Permitted Development?

Basements: Permitted Development?

The government has recently announced proposals for a temporary three year increase in permitted development rights to enable larger extensions to homes. What does this mean in practice for people considering or opposing a basement development?

The General Permitted Development Order (GPDO) permits extension to existing properties within certain levels. It is commonly accepted, although not expressly stated in the GPDO, that this includes developments above as well as below ground. Currently there are specific controls which concern the development of basement structures but these are limited in number. For example, a development should not extend beyond the rear wall of the house by more than four metres in the case of a detached house or three metres in the case of any other house.

The government has proposed the temporary increase in permitted development rights so as to encourage development on a larger scale by homeowners to their properties. Therefore, basement developments of a larger size could fall within permitted development rights and outside the control of the planning permission. As a result neighbours are likely to be faced with more development which could cause significant issues as regards the structural integrity of the property or noise and nuisance from the development.

However, it is interesting to note that even the local councils are questioning the merit of the Government’s proposals. It has been reported that Richmond Council intend to oppose the proposals and are looking at ways in which they can do so. It is thought that other Councils will follow suit. It will be interesting to see whether any of the Councils that are faced with numerous basement developments, such as Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, are among their number.

In the event that you require any further information on any of the topics raised in this article then please do not hesitate to contact Lauren Brown on 0207 079 2402.

We hope you have found this note useful; however it is general in nature and for information purposes only. It is not a substitute for legal advice. Therefore Bishop and Sewell LLP accepts no responsibility whatsoever for any loss howsoever arising in connection with any use of the contents of this article. If you require specific advice, then please contact us.

Consultant Opportunities

Consultant Opportunities

As we continue to grow our business we are particularly keen to hear from senior fee earners with a following who are looking for an excellent platform from which to service their existing client needs, or who may want the opportunity to refer or work syngergistically with a dynamic Central London Law Firm.

We are able to offer flexible working arrangements and remote working technology for the right people. This opportunity may particularly suit a more senior fee earner looking to wind down a practice or to hand work on in a mutually beneficial way, or those who want to work part-time. We offer a commission on work introduced and we have an excellent office environment and support team. We are particularly keen to hear from fee earners with a commercial or property following but will consider applications from any work area that fits with our overall business objectives.

Due to the large volume of applications that we receive we will only be able to acknowledge those applications where we wish to proceed to interview.

Leasehold Reform / Landlord & Tenant Solicitors

Leasehold Reform / Landlord & Tenant Solicitors

Leasehold Reform / Landlord & Tenant Solicitor(s) 0-3 years PQE.

The landlord and tenant team at Bishop & Sewell LLP are looking to recruit up to two solicitors with 0-3 years’ experience to join the expanding Leasehold Reform and Landlord & Tenant teams led by Mark Chick. We would also be interested to hear from more experienced fee earners, particularly those with a following as we look to continue the growth of this successful area of our business. Interested parties should apply with a CV and a covering letter in the first instance to Louise Moyles of our HR Department.

Mark Chick Comments On ‘Right To Manage’

Mark Chick Comments On ‘Right To Manage’

The summer edition of the Flat Living magazine takes a look at property management issues and the right to manage. There is a handy guide to this process in their supplement and Mark Chick comments on some of the practicalities and sets out a few key pointers on road successfully exercising the right to manage your property.

Basements: One Storey Or More?

Basements: One Storey Or More?

Residential owners may be familiar with their neighbours developing their properties and may even have come across the Party Wall Act which governs development close to or involving neighbouring properties. In the main this has concerned extensions to current properties on the surface; however, there is an increasing trend towards development below ground.

For some property owners this may not pose significant problems save for nuisance whilst works are carried out or the need for a party wall award. However, there are circumstances in which there can be significant disruption particularly as structural engineering is permitting more and more ambitious schemes.

The most common development may only consist of one storey below ground so as to increase the size of the property by an additional room. However, in the more substantial properties you could be looking at development that will increase the property’s size by perhaps one or more storey’s but there have been reports of properties being extended by as many as six storey’s below ground.

Developments of any size can present issues and not only those of a structural nature, the more ambitious the development, the more significant the potential problems which can cause structural damage to neighbouring buildings, health & safety concerning the excavations or nuisance cause by the works. In the main developments will be undertaken to a high standard utilising project managers who will be working to appropriate standards but this does not prevent issues arising.

If you have a development next door to you and you would like any assistance with issues raised in this article, then please do not hesitate to contact the Lauren Brown at Bishop and Sewell on 0207 631 4141.

We hope you have found this note useful; however it is general in nature and for information purposes only. It is not a substitute for legal advice. Therefore Bishop and Sewell LLP accepts no responsibility whatsoever for any loss howsoever arising in connection with any use of the contents of this article. If you require specific advice, then please contact us.